Developing countries operating under Article 5 of the Protocol now have to freeze by 2013 their HCFC production and consumption to the average of their 2009-2010 levels, followed by a 10 percent reduction by 2015, a 35 percent by 2020, a 67.5 percent by 2025, and a 100 percent phase-out by 2030 (with 2.5 percent allowed, if necessary, for servicing existing equipment until 2040). The same decision requires developed countries to accelerate their phase-out schedule by 10 years to completely eliminate HCFCs by 2020 (with 0.5 percent allowed, if necessary, for servicing existing equipment until 2030).

Action on HCFCs is important in that these chemicals have an impact on both ozone depletion and climate change. In terms of direct impact, the most commonly-used HCFCs have ozone depleting potentials (ODPs) ranging from 0.02 (HCFC-123) to 0.11 (HCFC-141b) and global warming potentials (GWPs) ranging from 76 (HCFC-123) to 2270 (HCFC-142b). Equipment using HCFCs consumes energy, which contributes to indirect global warming impacts.

Developing countries are close to a very important step in the new accelerated HCFC phase-out; the 2013 freeze. Taking early action that would facilitate compliance, specifically the establishment of policies and legislation, is therefore critical to a successful and smooth phase down.
source : HCFC Policy & Legislative Options